How to name compounds in the Rare Earth Chemical Element Card Game
In the Rare Earth Chemical Element Card Game, naming compounds is easy and fun.  Once you get the hang of it, you can name a compound every time you make one!  In The Rare Earth Chemical Element Card Game you make binary compounds.  That means you make a compound from 2 elements.  For instance, you can make a compound from a Metal and a Nonmetal:
You can also make a compound from 2 Nonmetals A metal and a nonmetal form an ionic compound.  A nonmetal and a nonmetal form a covalent compound.
Many elements are stabilized in compounds using just two cards.  For instance, Sodium has 1 arrow pointing out and Fluorine has 1 arrow pointing in.  A perfect match.
To name this ionic compound: - put the element with the out arrow first, - put the element with the in arrow second, - add the suffix “-ide” to the end of the second element, (replacing “-ine”).  So this compound is called: sodium fluoride
The Rubidium card has 1 arrow pointing out and needs 1 arrow pointing in to stabilize it.  If you bond the Rubidium card with an Iodine card, what would you name the compound?
The answer is rubidium iodide
Guess the name and then rollover to see if you guessed right.
Sometimes you can use more than 2 cards. For instance, when you make CO2, a covalent (molecular) compound, you use 3 cards.
To stabilize a compound with Carbon, we need a total of 4 arrows.  Oxygen has 2 arrows pointing in.  So, it will take two Oxygen cards to get the 4 arrows we need.
Carbon has 4 arrows pointing out.
We can’t call this molecule “carbon two-oxides”.  So how do we name it?  When naming covalent (molecular) compounds made with 2 Nonmetals, we use a Greek “Prefix” to show that the compound has 2 Oxygen atoms. Here is a chart of all the Prefixes:
Here is a chart of all the prefixes: 2=di, 3=tri, 4=tetra, 5=penta, 6=hexa, 7=hepta, 8=octa
For a single card no prefix is required (though sometimes Mono- is applied to the 
second element as in dihydrogen monoxide)
So the name of the compound above is: carbon dioxide
The Germanium card has 4 arrows pointing out and needs 4 arrows pointing in to stabilize it. 
If you bond the Germanium card with four Hydrogen cards, what would you name the compound?
Germanium card with 4 Hydrogen cards
The name of the compound is: germanium tetrahydride
Guess the name and then rollover to reveal the name of the compound.
How to name compounds in advanced Rare Earth Game play
Standard Rare Earth Game play is based on matching in-arrows with out-arrows to produce compounds.
(In effect, the standard version of The Rare Earth Chemical Element Card Game restricts game play to just binary ionic compounds and binary molecular covalent compounds.)  However, playing advanced levels of the Rare Earth Game requires an entirely different method of naming compounds.  For instance:
Molybdenum plus 3 oxygen cards
The name of the compound is; molybdenum trioxide
Guess the name and then rollover to reveal the name of the compound.
If you guessed molybdenum trioxide, you're right and that's good enough for basic game play. But molybdenum trioxide is not the best name for this compound.  If we're going to play Advanced Rare Earth, we're going to need to learn more advanced ways to name compounds.
High School Chemistry
Naming compounds with transition metals (IUPAC naming method). What happens when two elements can make many different compounds with different properties?  How do we make sure that every chemical name refers to just one specific substance?
The Molybdenum card has 6 arrows pointing out. In standard Rare Earth Game play, the arrows indicate the “oxidation state” of the element. However, in the real world,an element can have more than one oxidation state
which will change depending on how it bonds with another element. In the upper right hand 
corner of each card you’ll find a list of that element’s other possible oxidation states.  For instance, Molybdenum could have had 2, 3, 4, or 5 out-arrows instead of the 6 out-arrows shown on the card.
Now that we know that there is more than one way to stabilize Molybdenum, how does that affect the way we name the compound?
This is: molybdenum oxide.  But this name doesn't tell us the number of the oxidation state of Molybdenum.  We have to guess.
The alternative name of molybdenum oxide is: molybdenum (II) oxide 2 or II in Roman Numerals
Guess the oxidation state and then rollover to reveal the number.
But, we don’t want to guess.  We need a name that tells us exactly what substance we’re talking about.  Since Molybdenum is a Transition Metal, with many oxidation states, we have to use a different naming method.  We put the Roman numeral in brackets to show the oxidation state of Molybdenum.
molybdenum and 2 oxygen cards
This is: molybdenum dioxide  But this name doesn’t tell us the number of the oxidation state of Molybdenum.  We have to guess.
4 or IV in Roman numerals
Guess the oxidation state and then rollover to reveal the number
The alternative name of molybdenum dioxide is:
molybdenum (IV) oxide
Now guess the new name and then rollover to reveal the answer.
molybdenum plus 3 oxygen cards
This is molybdenum trioxide
But we stall can't tell what the oxidation state is of molybdenum.  Let's use the new naming method:
The alternative name of molybdenum trioxide is: molybdenum (VI) oxide
Guess the alternative name and the rollover to reveal the answer.
As long as you play with the oxidation states symbolized by the in-arrows and out-arrows on the cards, you can use the simplest method of naming compounds.  But, if you want to use alternative oxidation states, remember to name your compounds using the (IUPAC) naming method with the Roman numerals in brackets when you make compounds with transition metals.
Of course, for 11th and 12th grade high school chemistry students, there’s much more to naming polyatomic compounds than the rules used for the Rare Earth Game.  High school and university chemistry students who wish to make more advanced inorganic compounds (cations, acids and anions) with Rare Earth Game cards may ignore the arrows and refer to the additional oxidation states listed vertically in the upper right hand corner of each chemical element card.  You may wish to add more cards than are provided in the standard game before adding more complex inorganic compounds to game play.  The inventors of the Rare Earth Chemical Element Card Game welcome feedback on successes you’ve had experimenting with alternative ways to play the game.

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More advanced Rare Earth Game rules are under development and are coming soon.
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